Stories From The Field: Climate Resilience
Filters

Growing More Resilient Local Food Systems

When the pandemic shut down markets and restaurants, DIG farmers like Fernard and Cecile were prepared to fill in the gaps. Their gardens were no longer just reliable sources of food for their families, they became a critical resource for their entire community.

Read More

The Seed Savers of Kenya

The work of local seed savers is critical not only for their own household benefit but also for the benefit of their broader communities and the long-term survival of their local plants. These women, all DIG graduates, have become known as expert seed-savers are are a critical link in ensuring their food systems remain resilient and biodiverse.

Read More

Finding ways to limit post-harvest loss during COVID

The immediate effects of COVID-19 on food security and nutrition in Kenya cannot be under estimated. The restrictions in movement, closure of hotels and schools which act as a market for many farmers, and lack of supply for farm inputs pose a critical challenge to almost every farmer. The effect is much more devastating to low income households and communities that already face serious challenges such as HIV, drought or flooding and poor access to essential services. DIG’s program that

Read More

DIG Batwa Farmers: Katamas and Hope

This Batwa family used to beg for dregs, feeding their 5 children the leftover sorghum from a locally produced drink only once per day. When the couple joined the DIG program, they were skeptical of the outcome as many NGO’s had come to their village for projects that were short-term.

Read More

DIG Deeper: Batwa Program Entering Year 2

After getting on the ground in November 2016, DIG spent two months undergoing an intensive site assessment through a baseline study, stakeholder analysis, committee and leadership meetings, crop viability study, building a team, and fine tuning the implementation model.

Read More

Stories from the Field: Burkina Faso

Turning the Sahel into a Garden: Hot, dry and dusty are the most descriptive words that describe the current state of Ouagadougou.  One can sense it wants to rain so badly and indeed we have had two rains, however the ground is so hot and crusted it just seems to evaporate within hours and it is as dry and dusty as it was before the thunderstorm.  When the rains does come next month we should be very well prepared.  Even

Read More